Author Archives: guildschools

Innovation Award – CSE’s Asian Penguins

Charter School Innovation Awards presented by MACS (MinnPost)

In the area of increased learning opportunities for pupils, the St. Paul-based Community School of Excellence won for the work some of its students are doing with the Linux operating system and other open-source software to help close the technology divide in their community. At this K-8 Hmong language and culture charter school, middle school members of the Asian Penguin Club are refurbishing old computers by installing Linux software and donating them to families in need. The club, which began five years ago under the direction of the school’s technology coordinator, Stuart Keroff, has given away more than 60 computers.

Ted Kolderie, a contributor to the original charter-schools law who now serves as co-founder and senior fellow at Education Evolving, teed up the awards presentation on Tuesday by adding a bit of historical context to the awards.

“A lot of us who go back to the beginnings have the notion that the charter sector is basically about innovation, should be about innovation,” he said, adding it’s a small sector capable of making large-scale contributions when used as “a platform for innovation.”

Restoring Shanker’s Vision for Charter Schools

In 1988, education reformer and American Federation of Teachers president Albert Shanker proposed a new kind of public school—“charter schools”—which would allow teachers to experiment with innovative approaches to educating students. Publicly funded but independently managed, these schools would be given a charter to try their fresh approaches for a set period of time and be renewed only if they succeeded.

Restoring Shanker’s Vision

Where Did Charter Schools Come From?

From: Education Next, by By and

Next month marks the twenty-fifth anniversary of the enactment of America’s first charter school law, which Minnesota Governor Arne Carlson signed on June 4, 1991. This statute birthed a sector that has become not just a source of new schools for kids who need them, but also a structural reform of public education’s governance and delivery systems. It’s as close as K–12 schooling has come to what Clayton Christensen calls “disruptive innovation.” Continue reading